Best Wildlife Photography


What makes a wildlife photograph the best? Is it because it’s a tack-sharp, perfectly lit technical masterpiece? A jaw-dropping shot of megafauna? A glimpse of a rarely seen moment from the animal kingdom? A new perspective on ordinary behaviour?

I don’t think there’s one answer. Photography, like all art forms, is largely subjective. Sure, there’s a certain level of skill and knowledge that’s required to take a beautiful wildlife image; composition, exposure, lines, patience, diligence, etc. But what makes a wildlife image the best is really up to you, the viewer.

Well, we’ve certainly given you plenty to look at in Best Wildlife Photography 2018. To close out Canada’s 150th year and usher in the next 150, we looked back on the past seven issues of Best Wildlife Photography and chose images worthy of the designation “the best of the best.” Photographed by talented members of our 70,000-photographer-strong Canadian Geographic Photo Club, these images are the kind that prompted us, as magazine editors, creative directors and designers, to stop and say “Wow!”

Deadlock
The mating rituals of elk are confrontational. A bull elk with a harem of cows and calves will be aggressive in their defense and will battle other bulls for dominance, sometimes to the death.
Photographer: Jim Cumming
— – —

Making tracks
Heavy snow blankets the ground at the Kicking Horse Grizzly Bear Refuge, home to this grizzly named Boo.
Photographer: Neal Weisenberg
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Frosty feline
Called the ghost of the north woods, the lynx stays as silent as possible when stalking its prey, which is usually swift snowshoe hares.
Photographer: Chris Gale
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Whiteout
Many animals blend into their native environments, but rarely is their camouflage as uniform as this grey wolf’s.
Photographer: Bill Maynard
— – —

A parliament of owls
Snowy owls congregate on a picnic table at Ottawa’s Central Experimental Farm in the spring.
Photographer: Michelle Valberg
— – —

Spring surprise
Nestled into a vivid day lily, this spring peeper could easily be mistaken for tropical fauna, but these tiny tree frogs are suited to the cold. By hibernating under logs and in loose bark, they’re able to range well into the forests of eastern Canada.
Photographer: Brian Robin
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Best Wildlife Photography

more in Canadian Geographic
Special Collector’s Edition – Best Wildlife Photography 2018

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