Nikon D7500 or D7200… or D500… or D750?


Nikon’s new enthusiast all-rounder attempts to combine features, performance, image quality and value.

The Nikon D7500 does not boast any dramatic new technologies but it does fill a significant gap in Nikon’s DSLR range. Before, enthusiasts had to choose between the powerful but relatively pedestrian D7200 and the much more advanced – and much more expensive – D500. Nikon’s latest addition to its DX line-up is designed to offer a balance between high-end performance and features, and price.

The D7200 is cheaper and has 24 megapixels. why don’t I just buy that?

Yes, the D7200’s strengths are its range of features, outright image quality, solid construction and great handling. But it’s not a sports or low-light specialist. Its continuous shooting speed isn’t bad at 6fps, but its 26-shot Raw buffer capacity falls way short of the D7500’s 50 shots, and its AF system lacks Group Area AF mode. The D7200’s older sensor delivers plenty of resolution, but more noise with it, so by the time you reach medium to high-ISO settings, the difference in image quality between these two cameras will become apparent. It doesn’t have the D7500’s tilting screen or touch-screen control, either. And for video, the 4K D7500 is a clear winner.

The bottom line:The D7200 is a terrific all-round camera, but just remember it’s not built for speed or low light.

Will I regret not going the extra mile and buying the D500?

You might, but you need to be clear what the extra cash is getting you – another 2fps continuous shooting speed, an even larger memory buffer and Nikon’s latest high-tech 153-point autofocus system. The D500 is also built like a tank and uses Nikon’s professional control layout, and is slightly more responsive. The D500 has twin memory cards slots (1 SD, 1 XQD) whereas the D7500 only has one, and although its LCD is the same size, it has more than twice the resolution. You’re paying a lot more money and you’re getting a lot more camera, but the D500’s advantages are all geared to the rough and tumble of a serious action photographer’s lifestyle.

The bottom line:The D500 is worth the extra only for sports fans and pros looking for a second, speedy DX-format body.

At this price, why don’t I just take the plunge and go for the full frame D750?

Absolutely! But this is where you need some crystal-clear thinking about where you want to go with your photography. If you’re looking for an all-round improvement in image quality, like exploring a mixture of subjects and are keen to progress as an artist or as a professional, the D750 is indeed the better choice. A DX-format camera like the D7500 is restricted partly by its sensor size, but also by lens choice; for the best choice of primes and constant-aperture zooms at both standard and shorter focal lengths, Nikon’s FX format is the way to go. But if your interest lies in sports/action/low-light photography, the D7500 delivers more bang for your buck.

The bottom line:If you can afford to buy the D7500, maybe you can afford to go full frame with the D750.

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More in N Photo – Summer 2017
by Rod Lawton

Digital Camera World

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