Big Picture

Big Picture Natural World Photography Competition | 2017 Winners and Finalists Announced
We’re thrilled to share this year’s spectacular winners and finalists, chosen from nearly 6,000 entries.

Grand Prize
Confiscated, Denver, CO
Britta Jaschinski, England, UK

German wildlife photographer Jaschinski has been devoted to documenting the fractured existence of wildlife in captivity for over a decade. Her passion to protect animals, takes her across the globe to reveal otherwise untold stories about animal suffering. Jaschinski has received many international awards and lectures across Europe on photography and animal conservation issues.
These stools are only an example of the many deeply disturbing items that people try to smuggle through borders and airports across the globe. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stores 1.3 million seized items at a warehouse in Colorado. Trolleys are used to move the confiscated items around the warehouse. I placed the body parts on this backdrop to give some dignity to the objects and pay respect to the animals that loose their lives in the name of status, greed and superstition.
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Landscapes, Waterscapes, and Flora
Kamokuna Lava Firehose 25, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii
Jon Cornforth, Kilauea, Hawaii
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Winged Life
Snow Globe, Bosque del Apache, New Mexico
Denise Ippolito, Brielle, New Jersey
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2017 Series: Aerial Photography
Supra, New South Wales, Australia
Ray Collins, Sydney, Australia
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Terrestrial Wildlife
Ecosystem, Ermas National Park, Brazil
Marcio Cabral, Brasilia, Brazil
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Big Picture Natural World Photography Competition
2017 Winners and Finalists Announced

more at Big Picture Competition

National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year

Explore the prize-winning photos and download stunning wallpapers for all your devices. Share your favorite pictures with your friends and see the judge’s top picks.

Grand Prize Winner
The power of nature
by Sergio Tapiro Velasco
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Second Place Winner, Nature
To live.
by Hiromi Kano
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Third Place Winner, Nature
Crocodiles at Rio Tarcoles
by Tarun Sinha
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Honorable Mention, Nature
Marble Caves
by Clane Gessel
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People’s Choice Winner, Nature
Buff Tailed Coronet
by Hymakar Valluri
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National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year
Our panel of judges reviewed thousands of incredible images from around the world to select this year’s grand prize winner. See the spectacular travel photos that bested the competition and earned the top awards in each of the three categories.

more at National Geographic

Macro Collection

A Macro Collection So Cool You Must See To Believe
Thank you to all the photographers that shared their best macro photos showing inanimate objects in the Macro Still Life Photo Contest…

“destiny” by maperick
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“Story of Wars – Platoon” by jacksoncarvalho
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“20161120-PB200091” by EdithNero
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“otherworldy” by JenniferHannaPhotography
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“Peeling Paint ” by tricianicolescott
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“Brushing up on my Macro” by jamiesarkett
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“Anemone macro” by anitamuldernijhuis
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A Macro Collection So Cool You Must See To Believe
a lot more at viewbug

Comes A Horseman

Jill De Jong by William Rylott
Palos Verdes, California

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Comes A Horseman
Model Jill De Jong, Photographer William Rylott
Stylist Jason Le Bra, Hair and Make-up Melyna Reese
Horse Trainer Rachael McCaskill, Handler Bekah Brownfield

More in Supermodel Magazine

Prendre Conscience de la Fragilité de la Terre par Thomas Pesquet

Ce qui a le plus frappé le spationaute français pendant ses six mois dans la Station internationale, c’est la fragilité de la Terre: «l’atmosphère est vraiment une mince bande ridicule qui contient toute la vie. Autour, il n’y a rien, à des milliards d’années-lumière. J’ai vu la déforestation, les bandes rasées qui s’enfoncent dans les forêts en Amérique du Sud, les fleuves qui charrient des pollutions, des boues, le dégazage des bateaux, la pollution atmosphérique – je n’ai jamais pu prendre une photo de Pékin, par exemple. Voir tout cela, non plus seulement l’intellectualiser, ça change quelque chose… L’écologie, c’est bien, c’est important. Mais il est difficile de se représenter les problèmes, leur échelle nous dépasse. Là, j’ai vu, j’ai ressenti avec mes sens. Mince, c’est vrai, c’est là!

Risquer sa vie en allant dans l’espace fait réfléchir à ce qui est réellement important. J’aimerais que tous les décideurs de la planète voient le spectacle de la Terre depuis l’espace. Il n’y a pas de frontières. Il est extrêmement difficile de distinguer un pays d’un autre. La Terre n’est ni plus ni moins qu’un gros vaisseau spatial aux ressources limitées, avec un équipage de 7 milliards de personnes. La seule chose à faire, c’est de voyager en bonne intelligence et d’entretenir le vaisseau, comme nous le faisons avec l’ISS, pour que le voyage continue. Sinon, ça va s’arrêter très vite. Dans quelques centaines d’années, peut-être…»
lemonde.fr

Une Terre Si Fragile
Par Thomas Pesquet
© ESA / NASA

à voir dans Animan N201

From The Ground Up

David Yarrow is perspiring. It’s another sweltering 90-plus degree day in Kenya’s Amboseli National Park and the arid climate is sapping his energy and his patience. The park’s name means “place of dust” and it comprises 150-square miles of flat, largely featureless land on the border of Kenya and Tanzania. Yarrow has come with the hope of photographing lions and perhaps elephants, as he has done many times before. However, during his several days here, wildlife sightings have been sparse. The London-based photographer has repeatedly returned to the park because unlike other African destinations such as Serengeti and Mara national parks, Amboseli is not swamped with tourists—or other photographers.

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David Yarrow gets right in the action
by Robert Kiener

more in Professional Photographer – August 2017

In conversation with Peter Cox

Peter Cox left behind the heady world of IT infrastructure design in the United States to return to his native Ireland, where he is now a full-time professional landscaper. A gallery owner and workshop leader, he is also passionate about technological innovation and has become a leading light in drone photography…
Interview by Nick Smith

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In conversation with Peter Cox
more in Outdoor Photography – September 2017