InfraMunk vs Tracy Arm Fjord

InfraMunk vs Tracy Arm Fjord by Bradley G Munkowitz
During the Summer of 2016, Munko embarked on an Inspiring Adventure up the Best Coast of the United States – traveling pretty much as far north as it goes.. Venturing on a small Vessel, he toured and photographed the incomparable Tracy Arm Fjord in Juneau Alaska, and captured it’s picturesque landscapes in Full-Spectrum..These photographs were quite unique, as he was equipped with a custom modified Full-Spectrum FujiFilm X-T1 IR, a grip of LifePixel Super-Color Infrared Filters and some Vintage Nikon Manual Focus lenses – together producing some fiercely psychedelic and experimental palettes that portrayed the scenery in an entirely new light.

— – —

InfraMunk vs Tracy Arm Fjord
by Bradley G Munkowitz

more at behance

Advertisements

Projections | Sabine Wild

London, Paris, Rome, Berlin – Sabine Wild toured Europe’s major cities armed with a camera, ready to transform monuments and skylines in her very special way. Her architectural images are works of art composed of structures and light. Wild captures the world in lines. Her typical vertical and horizontal hatching creates a flickering structure. A fascinating picture in which only hints of the underlying reality remain.

Thanks to Sabine Wild, the Römer in Frankfurt seems like a gothic convention of lights. At the same time, it is not a picture that gives off a feeling of medieval confinement; bright and fresh colours dominate. In the Sachenshäuser Ufer, the artist brings a natural element into her normally very abstract visual language. Arising from the “real” cityscape, the wintry boughs are naturally formed shapes that do not want to assimilate into the horizontal lines of the river or the verticals lines of the Frankfurt skyline. In this way, Wild’s art creates an exciting contrast between art and reality, between alienation and naturalness.

In New York Projections and Asian Projections, Sabine Wild discovers the beauty of the night, which experiences a special appeal in cities full of artificial lights. The lit-up buildings, streetlights, and headlights serve as creative material for the artist’s urban compositions. Luminous batches of colour break through the graphical austerity that Wild otherwise consistently sticks to. The famous skylines of New York, Hong Kong, and Shanghai appear as if painted: Action Painting 2.0.

Sabine Wild has further developed her vertical-line visual language and discovered the digital means for creating her work. In post-processing, she designs her thrilling compositions – dark horizontal and vertical lines stand by powerful colours, painterly passages by graphical areas. As in painting, the energetic way the colour is applied determines the effect the image has. Sabine Wild reveals a new, impressive look at the world and its architecture.

— – —

Projections
by Sabine Wild

more at Lumas

Oceans | David Burdeny

Bau-Xi Photo is pleased to present Oceans, the latest series by David Burdeny. Oceans explores the geological formations of water bodies in the Bahamas, Australia, and Europe, capturing the complex, abstract qualities of the deep sea. Burdeny’s scenes are celebrations of the natural world, but, below the surface, they map a precious and precarious resource. Serpentine sandbars stretch into a Bahamian horizon; Australian bays are sharply rendered fields of impossible blue. Long exposures—evident in views of Sicily—soften waves, revealing formations beneath the water. Bodies that dot the cliff sides cast long shadows, indelible marks on an expanse otherwise untouched. The contemporary sublime is for Burdeny both a call to action that compels one to protect her world, and a message about culpability. Receding vistas are the dreamy escape; human presence is the sobering reminder. Like the depths his exposures reveal, Burdeny unearths layers—of not just the landscape—but the fraught relationship between the earth we inhabit and the environmental future we inherit.

David Burdeny (b. 1968. Winnipeg, Canada) holds Masters degrees in Architecture and Interior Design, and is the recipient of notable photography awards including Photographer of the Year (Nature category) at the International Photography Awards.
This exhibition has been selected as a featured exhibition for the annual Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.
— – —

Oceans | David Burdeny
more at Bau-Xi Gallery

Kuwait: A Desert on Fire | Sebastião Salgado

Kuwait: A Desert on Fire
by Sebastião Salgado

Nicholas Metivier Gallery is pleased to present its third solo exhibition with internationally renowned documentary photographer Sebastião Salgado. The exhibition coincides with the release of Salgado’s new book, Sebastião Salgado – Kuwait: A Desert on Fire, published TASCHEN. The exhibition will open on May 4th and run until May 27th with and opening reception on Thursday, May 4th. Kuwait: A Desert on Fire is a featured exhibition for the 2017 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival.

In April 1991, following the end of the First Gulf War, Sebastião Salgado travelled to Kuwait on assignment for the New York Times Magazine. Over 600 oil wells had been set ablaze by Iraqi forces after their occupation of Kuwait was thwarted by a US-led coalition. The region was in the midst of one of the worst man-made environmental catastrophes in recent history. Firefighters from around the globe, including the Safety Boss Team from Calgary, Alberta, had been sent to Kuwait to cap the wells and put out the massive fires.

Arriving in the Ahmadi Oil Fields, 20 miles south west of Kuwait City, Salgado came across a desert engulfed in flames, covered in oil and smothered in a thick black smoke. For one month, Salgado documented this apocalyptic landscape and the firefighters that worked relentlessly, despite the horrendous conditions. At the end of each day, the firefighters would bathe themselves in a man-made lake with gasoline and detergent to cleanse their oil-soaked bodies. Salgado carried a water bottle filled with gasoline to remove the oil from his hands and camera lens, prior to taking his photographs.

During his time in Kuwait, Salgado engaged with the firefighters, gaining their trust and respect. This is evidenced by the remarkable candidness shown by the men in his black and white photographs. Salgado was inspired by the firefighters’ professionalism and spirit. To him, they were the true heroes of the First Gulf War.  Salgado’s images are surreal reminders of the devastation suffered in Kuwait as a result of war and pay homage to the men who worked to contain the disaster.

A selection of photographs from Kuwait were published in a feature for The New York Times Magazine in 1991 and were part of Salgado’s photographic essay, Workers (1993). The majority of the photographs were archived and never released.  In 2016, the complete project was revisited to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the First Gulf War.

Born in Brazil in 1944, Salgado has been the recipient of numerous photographic prizes in recognition of his accomplishments, including the Gold Medal Award for Photography from the National Arts Club in New York. Several books have been published on Salgado’s work including Workers, Migrations and Genesis. Salgado was part of the well-known cooperative agency, Magnum Photos, for 15 years before founding his own agency, Amazonas images, in Paris with his wife Léila Wanick Salgado. Since 2013, Genesis has been touring to leading museums around the world including the British Museum, London, UK; International Centre of Photography, New York; Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris; Ara Pacis Museum, Rome and the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto. A 2015 documentary film on the life and work of Salgado, The Salt of The Earth, debuted at the Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for an Academy Award. Most recently, Salgado was appointed to the prestigious Académie des Beaux-Arts of the Institut de France.

— – —

Kuwait: A Desert on Fire
by Sebastião Salgado

more at Metivier Gallery

Monochrome Photography

Monochrome Photography Awards conducts an annual competition for professional and amateur photographers. Our mission is to celebrate monochrome visions and discover the most amazing photographers from around the world.
The winners of the Professional and Amateur categories will receive the titles: Monochrome Photographer of the Year and Monochrome Discovery of the Year along with cash prizes. We are open to all points of view, all levels of expertise, and all ideas of black and white photography.

Monochrome Awards Winners’ Gallery

Torre di Pisa by Ronny Behnert (Germany)
1st Place Winner – Architecture Photographer of the Year 2016
— – —

The magic of the night by Isabella Tabacchi (Italy)
Landscapes – 2nd Place Winner
— – —

Cleaning the Buddha by Gunarto Gunawan (Indonesia)
Conceptual – 3rd Place Winner
— – —

Vertical Horizon by Michel Kirch (France)
Fine Art – 1st Place Winner
— – —

Humanity by john gubertini (Italy)
Nature – 2nd Place Winner
— – —

Entre Noir Et Blanc by Patrick Ems (Switzerland)
Abstract – 1st Place Winner
— – —

In anticipation of a wonderful evening at the Ritz Carlton Hotel, 1931 in New York by Fierz Madeleine-Josephine (Switzerland)
Fashion / Beauty – 1st Place Winner
— – —

The shepherd by azzam alshuaibi (Kuwait)
People – 2nd Place Winner
— – —

Artemis by Andris Apsenieks (Latvia)
Nude – 1st Place Winner
— – —

Monochrome Awards Winners’ Gallery
more at monoawards

Floral Beauty in the Garden

Tammy Marlar’s guide to creating exquisite flower images this spring
Flowers are blooming in our gardens and across the countryside, making this the perfect time to put your botanical photography skills into practice; Tammy Marlar shows you how to capture standout images.

Make the flower, such as this pink dahlia, the dominant subject. Flowers are beautiful and intricate, and our images should accentuate their allure and infinite detail as much as possible.
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM lens, ISO 640, 1/200sec at f/5.6, handheld.
— – —

Look for harmonious colours and storytelling details. With markings resembling eyes, a nose and a mouth, this seed head appears to be in conversation with the one next to it.
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM lens, ISO 200, 1/200sec at f/3.2, handheld.
— – —

Rather than trying to get the whole subject, such as this eryngium seed head, in focus, choose a good plane of focus on the best angle of the flower, while paying equal attention to what is in your background.
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM lens, ISO 400, 1/200sec at f/4, handheld.
— – —

Tell stories and elicit emotions where you can. I changed the orientation of this picture, as the seed head with the mass of flowing white seeds made me think of an American Indian chief, with his feathered headdress, on horseback.
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 L Macro IS USM lens, ISO 400, 1/300sec at f/7.1, handheld.
— – —

Pick as perfect a flower specimen as possible. Noticing blemishes and removing cobwebs before you shoot an image can save you hours of retouching.
Canon EOS 5D MkIII with Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L II USM lens, ISO 400, 1/125sec at f/2.8, handheld.
— – —

Floral Beauty in the Garden
more in Outdoor Photography – June 2017

Fine EYE

Fine EYE Magazine is the sister publication of EYE-Photo Magazine an independent, online magazine, providing a platform to talented and enthusiastic photographers from all over the world to present their work, regardless their genre, to an international readership. Fine EYE Magazine is exclusively focusing on Fine Art Photography.

Kenneth Barker
— – —

Rui Lopes
— – —

Nuno Andrade
— – —

Özgür Koca
— – —

Mafalda Mainieri
— – —

Jose Tapia Photos
— – —

Cindy Vondran
— – —

Wolfgang Schmitt
— – —

Bob Chiu
— – —

Fine EYE Magazine
more at eye-photomagazine